Effects of Nontraditional Division III Lacrosse Participation on Movement Pattern Quality and Dynamic Postural Control.

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Effects of Nontraditional Division III Lacrosse Participation on Movement Pattern Quality and Dynamic Postural Control.

Rosenborough C, Collins SM, Smith E, Bowman TG.

 

ABSTRACT

Background/Purpose: No studies have observed the effects of a collegiate lacrosse season on movement pattern quality, dynamic postural control, or the accuracy of athletes’ perceived movement pattern quality. The purpose was to examine the effects of a nontraditional fall season on movement pattern quality, perceived movement pattern quality, and dynamic postural control in collegiate lacrosse athletes.

Design: Cross-sectional laboratory study.

Methods: Fifty men’s (age=19.38±1.24 years, height=182.63±6.16 cm, mass=82.37±8.46 kg) and 22 women’s (age=19.68±1.17 years, height=165.10±6.88 cm, mass=64.09±8.72 kg) lacrosse players were recruited. Outcome measures included individual Functional Movement Screen™ (FMS™) scores, self-reported perceived movement pattern quality scores, lower and upper extremity Y-Balance Test (YBT) measurements, and active dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) before the start and again at the end of the fall lacrosse season. Pre- and post-season measurements were assessed using paired t-tests and chi-squared analyses.

Results: FMS™ composite scores did not significantly change from preseason to postseason for males (p=0.74) or females (p=0.07). Male perceived movement pattern quality was significantly higher than measured for 10 of 12 movements (p<0.05). Female perceived movement pattern quality was significantly higher than measured for four of 12 movements (p<0.05). Asymmetry frequency significantly increased in males in the hurdle step from two individuals to nine (1=25.52, p<0.01), inline lunge from 10 to 20 (1=12.50, p<0.01), and shoulder mobility from 4 to 21 (1=78.53, p<0.01). Asymmetries in male athletes significantly decreased in the active straight leg raise from 26 to 8 (1=25.96, p<0.01). YBT composite scores increased in males for the right leg (p=0.001) and left leg (p<0.03). Right dorsiflexion ROM (p<0.001) and left dorsiflexion ROM (p<0.001) significantly decreased in males from preseason to postseason. YBT scores for the right leg significantly increased in females from preseason to postseason (p=0.01). YBT scores for females for the right arm significantly increased from preseason to postseason (p=0.045).

Conclusions: A 5-week season may not change overall movement pattern quality of men’s or women’s lacrosse players, but some individual movement scores diminished. Athletes may overestimate self-reported movement pattern quality and are therefore unlikely to individually address movement deficits. Male dynamic postural control may change throughout a season, resulting in a potential increased risk of injury later in the season due to compensatory patterns or changes in mobility, proprioception, or balance.

Level of Evidence: 3b

 

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